Forgot your password?



Back to login

Qatar creating spy networks in Gulf states, claims military expert
March 14, 2014, 10:29 am
Share/Bookmark

Arab officials have claimed Qatar and Turkey are establishing spy networks in GCC states to report on plans to act against the Muslim Brotherhood, a leading Gulf military analyst has said.

Director of research and consultancy at the Institute of Near East and Gulf Military Analysis (INEGMA), Dr Theodore Karasik, could not elaborate on the allegations during an interview with Arabian Business but said the suspected spying was a key element of the anger in Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain against fellow Gulf Cooperation Council member Qatar.

What had been private tensions between the countries began to spill into the public arena earlier this year when the UAE summoned the Qatari ambassador to explain comments aired on Doha-based broadcaster Al Jazeera that accused the UAE of being a country against Islamic rule.

They reached boiling point last week when Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain withdrew their ambassadors from Doha and Saudi Arabia threatened to block land and sea borders with Qatar unless it met several key demands, including ending ties with the Islamist group Muslim Brotherhood and closing down Al Jazeera.

Karasik said the escalating conflict had the potential to dramatically shift security ties in the region.
“There’s definitely a, I don’t want to say Cold War, but I would say Soft War [going on],” he told Arabian Business.

“There’s a major dispute ongoing that has immense consequences for the future security architecture of the region.”

According to Karasik, who is based in Dubai, the sudden action taken against Qatar is based on the emirate’s support of the Muslim Brotherhood, including financially backing the former Mohamed Morsi regime in Egypt and its “antagonistic” broadcaster Al Jazeera.

Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain also are angry at Qatar’s interference in their internal affairs and its increasingly close relationship with Turkey and Iran.

“Saudi Arabia, the UAE [and Bahrain] thought the new Emir [in Qatar] would be a change in Qatari attitude... but instead they’ve created a safe haven for the Brotherhood and the Brotherhood continues to get money and support from the Qatari government, which runs completely opposite to... Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain, who view the Brotherhood as a political Islamic organisation intent on tearing kingdoms apart,” Karasik said.

The veteran analyst expects the three Gulf states to continue to take action against Qatar until it changes course.

Saudi Arabia already has threatened to close its land border with Qatar, through which a significant amount of food and other exports pass.

The kingdom also could restrict access to its airports and airspace for Qatar Airways, potentially causing a dramatic dent in the airline’s budget and putting at risk its plans to launch a domestic-only carrier in Saudi Arabia later this year.

“There’s also the game of ‘what will [Saudi] papers say about Qatar,” Karasik said, suggesting the rulers could attack Qatar through media stories that impact the country’s reputation.

For example, Gulf media has been relatively low key – in contrast to Western media - in its reporting of how Qatar won the FIFA vote to host the World Cup 2022, amid allegations of corruption, as well as revelations that thousands of foreign labourers will die during construction of infrastructure for the event.
“These stories may be opening up again [in the Gulf],” Karasik said.

Oman, which has for years preferred to sit on the outside of the GCC alliance, and Kuwait, where the Muslim Brotherhood has its own political party, so far have not publicly spoken about the rift between their neighbours, although it is understood that Kuwait has privately expressed disappointment at the withdrawal of the ambassadors.

Share your views
CAPTCHA
 

"It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed."

"Envy comes from wanting something that isn't yours. But grief comes from losing something you've already had."

Photo Gallery