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Kuwaitis maintain old Ramadan traditions
June 10, 2017, 9:28 am
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Ramadan in Kuwait has a different flavor with its own set of customs and rituals that have been observed by generations and evoke the past with all its beautiful details.

Alongside the religious obligations, Ramadan in Kuwait has a different flavor with its own set of customs and rituals that have been observed by generations and evoke the past with all its beautiful details.
Like elsewhere in the Muslim world, people in Kuwait fast from dawn to sunset throughout the month.

Ramadan in Kuwait is a time of prayer, charity and heightened piety.
Ranging from traditional costumes and dishes to special Ramadan celebrations, Kuwaiti families continue to revive authentic traditions and restore social values that promote harmony among members of society.


Despite of the progress of life and civilization, Ramadan-related customs such as Graish, Gergean, Ghabgah, and Iftar cannon maintain their inherent traditional color.
In Kuwait, Ramadan gather people more through shared meals and other communal activities, and among these social customs is "Graish", a traditional pre-Ramadan feast when family members and friends gather to celebrate the last day of the month of Sha'aban and to prepare for Ramadan fasting.


The holy month's social activities primarily include the "Ghabgah" gathering; it is a dinner party between the Iftar meal at sunset and the suhoor meal at dawn, comprised of sharing food, stories and jokes with family and friends.


Since Ramadan is considered to be the most joyful month of the whole year, children also have their share of fun through a well rooted tradition called "Gergean", which is a festive heritage usually takes place between the 13th and 15th nights of the holy month of Ramadan.


Dressing up in their finest traditional clothes, boys and girls stroll around their neighborhoods, singing happy songs as they knock on their neighbors' doors seeking treats and candy in exchange for a song.
Another significant Ramadan tradition that has stood the passage of time is the Iftar Cannon stationed at the beautifully restored Naif Palace in Kuwait.

When the cannon sounds, it announces that it is time for breaking the fast.
Even though times have changed, and the tradition is quite old, the firing of the cannon attracts droves of children and families daily, a single shot announces the end of a fast, while two shots announce the beginning of the Holy Month of Ramadan, and Eid Al-Fitr.


The Holy Month of Ramadan is an interesting blend of piety and festivity, it creates a lifestyle in which the coffee houses and restaurants are jammed in the evening, television viewership greatly increases to include new entertainment programs, and more enjoyable social gatherings are organized.


Although many of the customs and traditions have changed over the years, and almost all of the forms of these activities have become modified and reinterpreted to fit modern life styles, the spirit of Ramadan in Kuwait continues to thrive.

Source: KUNA

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